Chinh Do

Posting a feed to Google Search Appliance (GSA) from PowerShell

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14th November 2014

Posting a feed to Google Search Appliance (GSA) from PowerShell

PowerShell code to submit a feed to Google Search Appliance:

$dataSource = "MyFeed" # replace this with your datasource name
$gsaUrl = "http://testsearch.example.com:19900/xmlfeed"; # replace this with your GSA URL

$xml = @"



$dataSource incremental
"@ Write-Output "Submitting feed to $gsaUrl." $body = "feedtype=metadata-and-url&datasource=$dataSource&data=$xml" $contentType = "multipart/form-data" $length = $body.Length Write-Output "Posting feed to GSA:" Write-Output $xml $r=Invoke-WebRequest -uri $gsaUrl -method POST -body $body -ContentType $contentType -UserAgent "Ps-GsaFeedSubmitter"

See also Feeds Protocol Developer’s Guide

posted in PowerShell, Programming | 0 Comments

13th September 2014

Finding the Last Friday (or any weekday) of the Month in PowerShell

If there are less than 7 days left in the month, then it’s the last weekday of this type in this month.

function Is-LastWeekDayOfMonth([DateTime] $d) {
    return [DateTime]::DaysInMonth($d.Year, $d.Month) - $d.Day -lt 7
}

Similarly, finding the last specific weekday of the month involves finding the last weekday, and the difference between that weekday and the target weekday:

function Get-LastFridayOfMonth([DateTime] $d) {    
    $lastDay = new-object DateTime($d.Year, $d.Month, [DateTime]::DaysInMonth($d.Year, $d.Month))
    $diff = ([int] [DayOfWeek]::Friday) - ([int] $lastDay.DayOfWeek)

    if ($diff -ge 0) {
        return $lastDay.AddDays(- (7-$diff))
    }
    else {
        return $lastDay.AddDays($diff)
    }    
}

posted in PowerShell, Programming | 1 Comment

12th March 2014

Running MSDEPLOY from PowerShell

I had to spend quite a bit of time figuring this out. So hopefully this will help someone out there. To launch MSDEPLOY from PowerShell, make sure you escape any quote or comma characters.

The “2>&1” at the end allows Powershell to detect errors and bail out if you have $ErrorActionPreference = “Stop”

If you still have problems, download and use EchoArgs.exe to see exactly what PowerShell sees.

Example

 

function Get-MSWebDeployInstallPath(){
  $path = (get-childitem "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\IIS Extensions\MSDeploy" | Select -last 1).GetValue("InstallPath")
  $path = "${path}msdeploy.exe"

  if (!(Test-Path "$path")) {
    throw "MSDEPLOY.EXE is not installed. See http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9278654"
  }

  return $path
}

$msdeploy = Get-MSWebDeployInstallPath

& $msDeploy -verb:sync -source:recycleApp `
  -dest:recycleApp=`"${webSiteName}`"`,recycleMode=StopAppPool`,wmsvc=${server}`,userName="${userName}"`,password="${password}" `
  -allowuntrusted -debug 2>&1

posted in Dotnet/.NET - C#, PowerShell | 0 Comments

16th January 2010

Give The Power of Speech and Sound to Your PowerShell Scripts

Do you ever have the problem where you start a long running script (such as running a code build), multi-task on something else on another monitor while waiting for the script to finish, and then totally forget about the script until half an hour later? Well, here’s a solution your problem: have your script give you holler at you when it’s done.

Hello sir! I am done running your command!

In my library script file, I have the following functions to play sound files and to speak any text:

function PlayMp3($path) {
    # Use the default player to play. Hide the window.
    $si = new-object System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo
    $si.fileName = $path
    $si.windowStyle = [System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle]::Hidden
    $process = New-Object System.Diagnostics.Process
    $process.startInfo=$si
    $process.start() 
}

function PlayWav($path) {
    $sound = new-Object System.Media.SoundPlayer;
    $sound.SoundLocation="$path";
    $sound.Play();
}

function Say($msg) {
    $Voice = new-object -com SAPI.SpVoice
    $Voice.Speak($msg, 1 )
}

If you like the text-to-speech feature but find Windows’ speech engine lacking, check out Ivona. It’s a commercial text-to-speech engine but you are allow to generate and download short speech files for free personal use. Now, my script can nicely interrupt me to tell me when it’s done. Other online text-to-speech engines: vozMe, SpokenText.

If Making Noise Is Not Your Thing

If making noise is not your thing, consider displaying a message in the Notification Area. Here’s the code (courtesy Microsoft TechNet):

Build complete!

function Get-ScriptName {
    $MyInvocation.ScriptName
} 

function DisplayNotificationInfo($msg, $title, $type) {
    # $type - "info" or "error"
    if ($type -eq $null) {$type = "info"}
    if ($title -eq $null) {$title = Get-ScriptName}

    [void] [System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("System.Windows.Forms")
    $objNotifyIcon = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.NotifyIcon 
    # Specify your own icon below
    $objNotifyIcon.Icon = "C:CdoScriptsFolder.ico"
    $objNotifyIcon.BalloonTipIcon = "Info"  
    $objNotifyIcon.BalloonTipTitle = $title
    $objNotifyIcon.BalloonTipText = $msg

    $objNotifyIcon.Visible = $True 
    $objNotifyIcon.ShowBalloonTip(10000)
}

posted in PowerShell, Programming | 3 Comments

7th January 2010

Automating Maven with PowerShell

I found out the hard way that mvn (Maven) on Windows always return a success code of true, which means you cannot use the return code ($?) to check whether the mvn command succeeded or failed. Why they decided to break this seemingly basic program contract is a mystery. A work-around is to scan the mvn output and look for specific strings such as “BUILD SUCCESSFUL”.

Here’s how:

function InvokeAndCheckStdOut($cmd, $successString, $failString) {
    Write-Host "====> InvokeAndCheckStdOut"
    $fullCmd = "$cmd|Tee-Object -variable result" 

    Invoke-Expression $fullCmd
    $found = $false
    $success = $false
    foreach ($line in $result) {
      if ($line -match $failString) {
       $found = $true
       $success = $false
       break
      }
      else {
       if ($line -match $successString) {
        $found = $true
        $success = $true
        #"[InvokeAndCheckStdOut] FOUND MATCH: $line"
        break
       }
       else {
        #"[InvokeAndCheckStdOut] $line"
       }
      }
    }

    if (! $success) {
      PlayWav "${env:windir}\Media\ding.wav"
      throw "Mvn command failed."
    }

    Write-Host "InvokeAndCheckStdOut <===="
}

function InvokeMvn($cmd) {
    InvokeAndCheckStdOut $cmd "BUILD SUCCESSFUL" "BUILD FAILED"
}

InvokeMvn "mvn clean install"

See Also

posted in PowerShell, Programming | 1 Comment

5th January 2010

Tee-Object and Invoke-Expression in PowerShell

The PowerShell Tee-Object Cmdlet allows you to send command output to a file or a variable, and display it in the console at the same time. This is very useful for those instances where you need to parse the text output of a command. I had a hard time getting it to work with Invoke-Expression. After trying different things, I finally found the solution. To get Tee-Object to work with Invoke-Expression in PowerShell 1, include the Tee command in the Invoke-Expression command like this:

Invoke-Expression "mvn clean install | Tee –variable result”

The following, which I guess is what most people try first, doesn’t work (at least in PowerShell V1). I guess because you are storing the result of the “Invoke-Expression” command itself into the variable instead of “mvn clean install”.

    Invoke-Expression "mvn clean install” | Tee -variable result

Wrapping Invoke-Expression in parenthesis (see below) works, but has a drawback: the output is not written to Standard Out until the whole command finishes.

    (Invoke-Expression "mvn clean install”) | Tee -variable result

posted in PowerShell, Programming | 1 Comment

10th December 2009

Create a Temporary File in PowerShell

$tempFile = [IO.Path]::GetTempFileName()

An empty file created immediately when you call this method. Remember to clean it up when are you done!

image

posted in PowerShell, Programming | 1 Comment

12th February 2009

Bag of Links #2

.NET/C# Programming

PowerShell

Apps and Tools

Other Stuff

posted in Dotnet/.NET - C#, Links, PowerShell, Programming, Silverlight, Software/tools, Technology | 0 Comments

23rd January 2009

Bag of Links #1

A while ago I had been posting my Finds of the Weeks series and this is the continuation of that. Instead of weekly though, this series will be more of a “whenever possible” kind of thing.

General Programming

.NET/C# Stuff

Database

Windows

Software, Tools, etc.

  • If you have a Linksys WRT54* router, I highly recommend loading Tomato firmware. I have been using it for about 6 months now and it’s so much better than the built-in Linksys firmware. Tomato’s QOS works great to make sure my Vonage phone line remains usable at all times.Tomato firmware

PowerShell

  • Ben Pierce posted a series of very useful PowerShell command-line demos: Demo1 (Administering Windows), Demo 2 (Administering Servers in bulk), Demo 3 (How do I Know Which Class to Use), Demo 4 (Administering Hyper-V).

Something Different

posted in Dotnet/.NET - C#, PowerShell, Programming, Software/tools, Technology, Windows Mobile / Pocket PC | 2 Comments

27th August 2008

Interesting Finds – August 27, 2008

If you are a subscriber to my blog, you may have noticed that I have not been posting my more “Finds of the Week” in the last 2 months. Well, I was a little busy with the month-long Euro 2008 tournament in June, plus a couple of new games (Crysis and Medieval Total War II). Finally the Olympics in August finished me off.

I am going to turn this series into a periodic (as in longer than weekly :-)) Interesting Finds series from now on.

Oh, if you want to know… Crysis is ok. Very good graphics and requires a hot rod box but gameplay is just ok. I am more into realistic squad-based shooters. Medieval 2 is very addictive.

.NET, C#

Programming, General

PowerShell

  • I am finding more and more things I can do with PowerShell everyday. The other day I had to “touch” a file… two lines is what it takes:

    PS C:\Users\Cdo\AppData\Local\Temp> $f = ls testFile.txt
    PS C:\Users\Cdo\AppData\Local\Temp> $f.LastWriteTime = new-object System.DateTime 2007,12,31
    PS C:\Users\Cdo\AppData\Local\Temp> ls testFile.txt
    
    
        Directory: Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::C:\Users\Cdo\AppData\Local\Temp
    
    
    Mode                LastWriteTime     Length Name
    ----                -------------     ------ ----
    -a---        12/31/2007  12:00 AM          8 testFile.txt
    
    
    PS C:\Users\Cdo\AppData\Local\Temp>

Something Different

posted in Dotnet/.NET - C#, PowerShell, Programming | 2 Comments

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